ECOSYSTEM, ART & TOURISM (E.A.T.) CONSERVATION

PLASTIC AFFECTED BEACHES OF ACCRA

CLIMATE CHANGE & ECOTOURISM

You may have heard about the floating plastic island caught in the middle of ocean currents. You may have seen pictures of turtles with shell indentations caused by plastic rings from soda bottles, and birds with plastic in their stomachs.

What you may not know is that wildlife never has to come directly into contact with the plastic itself to be affected by its toxins. Plankton, microorganisms floating in masses and a source of food for many of the ocean’s inhabitants, come into contact with plastic and absorb the toxins directly into their systems. Later, when larger animals consume the plankton, they accumulate these toxins over a period of time. This causes a multitude of health issues.

There are many human factors in climate change, and one of the side effects of climate change is the spread of invasive species to areas previously uninhabitable to them. One way that these species reach these spaces is through “plastic islands” throughout the ocean.

Plastic creation is a big part of fossil fuel use worldwide. The harm to the environment is two-fold. Not only does the production of plastics contribute to global warming by using fossil fuels, but the discarded plastics trapped by varying ocean currents causes alien species to spread.

ART CONSERVATION

Art conservation includes principles and practices of technical examination, documentation, and treatment for objects of material culture. The intention of art conservation is to improve the condition of an artifact by stabilizing physical condition problems and addressing surface disfigurement arising from deterioration and/or damage. In doing so, the art conservator strives to retain as much original material as possible and to employ the best quality materials and the most carefully considered methods available.

At times a conservation treatment also requires restoration, which is defined as the preparation and incorporation of replacement parts and surface finishes (i.e. ‘compensation for losses’) to allow proper visual interpretation of an art object and to recapture an acceptable aesthetic appearance. Professional art conservators will always be glad to discuss their approaches and available options for the restoration component of a conservation treatment with you.

Another often-used term is preservation, which encompasses all of the varied activities involved in preventing damage and reducing the rate of deterioration for art objects, collections, and structures. Professional art conservators provide services related to preservation issues including display methods, archival quality storage solutions, environmental condition challenges, pest management, and packing for transportation.

CAPTAIN HOLMES FORT

HERITAGE CONSERVATION

Heritage conservation is important for identifying, recording, analyzing and protecting heritage and cultural resources. Conservation of heritage buildings is an important tool in city development which can be seen in some cities in the world. It plays an important role to define the landmark within the heritage area as well as to generate economic return and to support the tourism industry. Conservation of heritage buildings is very important because it provides a sense of identity and continuity in a fast changing world for future generations.

Heritage buildings basically represent the past history and culture of a nation. They constitute together the architectural heritage of an area. Heritage buildings possess historical values resulting from their beautiful architecture and their correlation with important events that occurred in the heritage area such as religious, social and political events.

RUBBLE OF SEA VIEW HOTEL BUILT AS THE FIRST HOTEL BY THE BRITISH DURING THE FIRST BRITISH SETTLEMENT IN ACCRA (PULLED DOWN BY BULLDOZERS) — Built 1870

Heritage buildings are subjected to processes of degradation with time, which leads to a situation in which they become not able to fulfill the purpose for which they were built.